Synopsis

The Case for Local Control in Internet Regulation

The Case for Local Control in Internet Regulation

Scholars advocate an expansive role for local decision-making in internet governance.

Recentering Worker Welfare in the Breakup Debates

Recentering Worker Welfare in the Breakup Debates

Scholar shows how current antitrust remedies fail to consider effects on workers.

Collecting Information on Artificial Intelligence

Collecting Information on Artificial Intelligence

Scholar advocates new research on current and emerging uses of advanced technologies.

The Road to Clean Air Is a Toll Road

The Road to Clean Air Is a Toll Road

Scholar argues that legal barriers should not prevent cities from using congestion pricing to curb traffic.

The Truth About Toxic Prisons

The Truth About Toxic Prisons

Scholar argues that many U.S. prisons are built on hazardous waste sites and lack oversight.

An Early History of Rulemaking Power

An Early History of Rulemaking Power

Scholar investigates an early exercise of federal administrative power that mirrors modern agency rulemaking.

Ending “Pass the Harasser” in Higher Education

Ending “Pass the Harasser” in Higher Education

Scholars call for rules to require screening of faculty hires for previous sexual misconduct.

The Fair Housing Act’s Unexpected Potential

The Fair Housing Act’s Unexpected Potential

Scholar shows how to use fair housing law to combat gentrification’s harms.

Charting a Course Toward Offshore Aquaculture

Charting a Course Toward Offshore Aquaculture

A CRS report finds that offshore aquaculture can spur economic growth if permitting reform takes place.

An Actual War on Climate Change?

An Actual War on Climate Change?

Scholar asserts that the U.S. executive branch can regulate climate change as a national security threat.

A New Approach to FTC Antitrust Regulation

A New Approach to FTC Antitrust Regulation

Scholar proposes a no-collusion rule to limit tacit collusion.

The Magnification of Arrest Information

The Magnification of Arrest Information

Scholar shows that regulatory bodies use arrests as informational proxies—but that this use has its costs.