Social Media

Making Social Media Self-Regulation More User-Centered

Making Social Media Self-Regulation More User-Centered

Scholar argues that social media companies should be more democratic in restricting political advertisements.

Regulating Beyond the Christchurch Call

Regulating Beyond the Christchurch Call

International response to Christchurch attack shows the complexity of restricting online extremist content.

Antitrust and the Future of Big Tech

Antitrust and the Future of Big Tech

Technology giants face growing scrutiny from Congress and regulators over their dominance.

Put the Phone Down

Put the Phone Down

Scholar argues that the government should regulate app developers to prevent technology addiction.

Should Regulators Shame Companies into Compliance?

Should Regulators Shame Companies into Compliance?

Naming and shaming can serve as a legitimate, efficient, and democratic regulatory approach.

Shame on You!

Shame on You!

Scholar argues that shaming is an effective tool against violators of regulations.

Correcting a Persistent Myth About the Law that Created the Internet

Correcting a Persistent Myth About the Law that Created the Internet

Scholar argues that section 230 of the Communications Decency Act applies to internet platforms regardless of their “neutrality.”

Why Less Suicide Prediction on Social Media Is More

Why Less Suicide Prediction on Social Media Is More

Facebook does not have a viable system to predict suicide in users.

Deep Fake News

Deep Fake News

Scholars argue that video and audio fabrications could threaten modern government but lack satisfactory regulatory solutions.

Disinformation and the Threat to Democracy

Disinformation and the Threat to Democracy

Scholars argue for strengthening regulations of online political advertising.

Exposing Children on the Internet

Exposing Children on the Internet

Law student argues that recent European Union privacy regulation does not fully protect children.

Regulating Instagram Posts

Regulating Instagram Posts

Author argues that FTC disclosure rules may infringe upon endorsers’ right to free speech.