Cary Coglianese

Cary Coglianese is the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he currently serves as the director of the Penn Program on Regulation and the faculty advisor to The Regulatory Review (formerly RegBlog). He specializes in the study of regulation and regulatory processes.

Taking Regulation Seriously

Taking Regulation Seriously

President Obama’s joke about spilled milk helps illustrate the need to understand how regulations actually work.

A Backwards Idea from the FCC

A Backwards Idea from the FCC

The public should not be required to submit copies of material cited in rulemaking comments.

Is the Regulatory Sky about to Fall?

Is the Regulatory Sky about to Fall?

Claims that the Regulatory Accountability Act will paralyze agencies have a long pedigree.

Making the Rulemaking Process Accessible to Ordinary Citizens

Making the Rulemaking Process Accessible to Ordinary Citizens

Administrative agencies should design their websites with rulemaking participation by the general public in mind.

Tracking Down Killer Regulations

Tracking Down Killer Regulations

The federal government lacks an independent office to provide retrospective analysis of regulations’ costs and benefits.

The Administration’s Regulatory Review Plans Move Toward Evidence-Based Governance

The Administration’s Regulatory Review Plans Move Toward Evidence-Based Governance

The White House has just released the first plans for retrospective reviews of existing regulations from thirty agencies, making a notable step toward evidence-based governance.

Open Government and Its Impact

Open Government and Its Impact

Defining open government and conceptualizing its success are key first steps in developing a transparency research agenda.

Let’s Review the Rules

Let’s Review the Rules

Agencies can narrow the political gap over regulation by retrospectively measuring the actual impact of their regulations.

New Executive Order Promotes Public Participation

New Executive Order Promotes Public Participation

Obama’s recent order makes promising strides toward improving participation in agency rulemaking.

E-Government and Inequality in Public Participation

E-Government and Inequality in Public Participation

The Internet has not made the government more democratic, at least not yet.

Elena Kagan and the Regulatory State

Elena Kagan and the Regulatory State

Elena Kagan’s appointment underscores an important shift in American law toward legislation and regulatory law.

Open Government Plans Revealed

Open Government Plans Revealed

Federal agencies take steps to increase government transparency.