Cary Coglianese

Cary Coglianese is the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he currently serves as the director of the Penn Program on Regulation and the faculty advisor to The Regulatory Review (formerly RegBlog). He specializes in the study of regulation and regulatory processes.

On the Pitfalls of Performance Standards

Governments need to consider the limitations of performance standards when choosing regulatory strategies.

Designing Safety Regulations for High-Hazard Industries

New National Academies of Sciences report offers much-needed clarity about regulatory design decisions.

The Legal Risks of Regulating Climate Change at the Subnational Level

State and local regulators will face challenges in trying to pick up the slack after a federal withdrawal from the Paris Agreement.

Why Cabinet Secretaries Should Not Threaten Members of Congress

Basic principles of American government limit the political role of administrative agencies in legislative debates.

Adjudicating by Algorithm, Regulating by Robot

Rather than raising alarm bells, government uses of artificial intelligence fit well within existing legal frameworks.

Announcing The Regulatory Review

This publication’s new name and newly designed website constitute a significant step forward, in furtherance of its mission of public service.

Is Government Truly Broken?

Citizens and their leaders must strive to work together to solve problems and improve social and economic conditions.

Teaching Regulatory Law Through Online Publishing

Students who participate in RegBlog gain in-depth knowledge about regulation and hone vital professional skills.

The Elusiveness of Regulatory Capture

Regulatory capture is hard to pin down, its elusiveness stemming from four principal factors.

Robot Regulators Could Eliminate Human Error

Scholar examines what a world of regulation by robot might look like—an innovation that could be just around the corner.

Seasons of Regulation

Assessing the past five years in regulation—and RegBlog’s achievements during this time—goes beyond numbers.

Rulemaking’s Puzzles

Study explains increase in regulation despite supposed rulemaking ossification.