Cary Coglianese

Cary Coglianese is the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he currently serves as the director of the Penn Program on Regulation and the faculty advisor to The Regulatory Review (formerly RegBlog). He specializes in the study of regulation and regulatory processes.

Using Machine Learning to Improve the U.S. Government

Governmental use of artificial intelligence can fit well within existing administrative law constraints.

Justice Stevens’s Legacy to the Administrative State

The late justice’s opinion in Chevron v. NRDC has greatly shaped judicial reasoning about administrative law.

What Does Risk-Based Regulation Mean?

Risk-based regulation requires regulators to choose which decision-making principles to apply.

Improving Regulations.gov

Implementing ACUS recommendations would enhance access to rulemaking materials.

Strengthening Accountability for Aviation Safety

Requiring airplane manufacturing CEOs to certify airplane safety could prevent tragedies.

Regulatory Vigilance in a Changing World

In a new book, Cristie Ford advocates that regulators pay closer attention to private-sector innovation.

It’s Time to Cut the Hidden Climate Tax

As global temperatures rise, Americans will continue to pay the economic costs of climate change.

The Legal System and Its Reform

Barton and Bibas argue for significant changes to improve justice in the legal system.

The Ambiguity in Judge Kavanaugh’s Chevron Critique

Judge Kavanaugh’s views on Chevron may create more uncertainty than exists under the current doctrine.

Trump Never Really Ordered a Halt to Child Separations

The President’s executive order purportedly ending family separations was merely symbolic.

It’s Time to Think Strategically About Retrospective Benefit-Cost Analysis

Retrospective regulatory review should concentrate not only on reducing costs but also on creating benefits, like improving societal well-being.

“Good Cause” Does Not Mean Anything Goes

Despite speculation about his intent to fire the special counsel, President Trump is not above the law.