Richard J. Pierce, Jr.

Richard J. Pierce, Jr. is the Lyle T. Alverson Professor of Law at The George Washington University Law School.

Important Changes at the Intersection of Antitrust and Administrative Law

Important Changes at the Intersection of Antitrust and Administrative Law

Supreme Court changes in administrative law create uncertainty for new antitrust guidance from federal regulators.

Vaccine Mandates and Roads Not Taken

Vaccine Mandates and Roads Not Taken

Another regulatory approach to mandate vaccines could have withstood judicial scrutiny.

Mass Comments Should Be Discouraged

Mass Comments Should Be Discouraged

ACUS should discourage the submission of mass comments in the notice and comment rulemaking process.

Compromise Between Radicals and Incrementalists in Antitrust Reform

Compromise Between Radicals and Incrementalists in Antitrust Reform

Harmonizing two approaches to antitrust law reform may protect consumer and market welfare most effectively.

The Need to Change Jurisdiction Over the U.S. Electric Grid

The Need to Change Jurisdiction Over the U.S. Electric Grid

When state and local voters prohibit clean energy transmission lines, they halt progress on climate change mitigation.

Cognitive Limits on the Value of Consumer Autonomy

Cognitive Limits on the Value of Consumer Autonomy

Cold weather spikes in Texas electricity prices reveal the risks of uninformed consumer choice in complex markets.

The Biden Administration Should Abandon the Case Against Google

The Biden Administration Should Abandon the Case Against Google

Government antitrust actions do not work in a high-technology market in which big businesses prove more efficient.

Reason Trumps Pretext

Reason Trumps Pretext

Requiring government institutions to engage in reasoned decision-making mitigates actions made in bad faith.

Ending Legislative Impotence

Ending Legislative Impotence

A recent Supreme Court case suggests Congress needs new processes to legislate effectively and overcome partisanship.

Delegation’s Critics Should Be Careful What They Wish For

Delegation’s Critics Should Be Careful What They Wish For

The history of the intelligible principle test warrants caution in reviving the nondelegation doctrine.

Natural Gas is Key to Addressing Climate Change

Natural Gas is Key to Addressing Climate Change

Natural gas continues to play a vital role in reducing U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

Delegation, Time, and Congressional Capacity

Delegation, Time, and Congressional Capacity

Courts should continue to apply canons of construction narrowly to limit the broad congressional delegation of power.